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Compathos Film Projects
Drawn Form Water The Movie
Location: Your Community
Purpose : View film pay per view, host a screening
NEEDS:    View Film, host a screening

View the film / Pay per View $5.99


Executive producers of Drawn from Water the Movie are proud to announce partnership with Global Team for Local Initiatives (GTLI) which is dedicated to helping indigenous people lead healthy lives. GTLI works closely with tribal elders to help communities implement sustainable development projects for long-term survival as well as income generating activities for immediate relief. Through projects in water, health, education, and income generation, they are helping ancient tribes, affected by drought and disease, adapt to their changing world while maintaining their traditional cultural values.

Among the many tribes in So Ethiopia, GTLI is working with the 23,000 member Hamar tribe, one of the world's oldest cultures and one of the most endangered.

Pay per View proceeds to benefit GTLI Child Sponsorship Program. Tribal custom forces the Hamar to abandon and kill "mingi" children, who are believed to bring bad luck to the community. GTLI intervenes, cares for these children, and works to eradicate this Harmful Traditional Practice.

Tribal custom forces the Hamar to abandon and kill "mingi" children, who are believed to bring bad luck to the community. GTLI intervenes, cares for these children, and works to eradicate this Harmful Traditional Practice. $50/month will care and support a Mingi child and aid GTLI work to eradicate this Harmful Traditional Practice.

GTLI Child Sponsorship Program has three objectives:
1) Intervene, care, support and reunify mingi children with birth families;
2) Facilitate eradication of Mingi Harmful Traditional Practice (HTP); and
3) Build capacity of local government to assume management of project with technical backstopping provided by UNICEF.

Among the many tribes in So Ethiopia, GTLI works specifically with the Hamar. According to government estimates, approximately 40 children are abandoned to die each year in Hamar woreda (locals estimate 100 ). These children are labeled "mingi," which means unwanted, not needed, the cause of misfortune, unlucky and associated with bad occurrences. In accordance with Hamar social values and norms, parents are forced to abandon or kill their "mingi" child as a prerequisite to stay in the community.
Many tribes of southern Ethiopian possess a tradition-rich culture based on ancient beliefs and rituals dating back hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years. Living in almost total isolation in some of the planets' harshest conditions - a region National Geographic calls the "last frontier" - these indigenous people's lives are diverse and resilient.

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